July 7

Oops! No Dairy in the Coconut Milk Ice Cream

5  comments

In the recipe I posted on July 5 for the Coconut Milk Ice Cream, an astute reader caught a glaring error: the last ingredient listed in this ‘supposedly casein-free’ version was (gulp!) heavy cream.

It should have read about 4 ounces original flavor (no sugar added) rice milk. We used the Whole Foods 365 brand, which is our grandson’s regular milk substitute. The reason for the “about” is that you’re adding enough rice milk to end up with 3 cups of milk-like liquid and the two cans of coconut milk come up a tad shy of 3 cups when combined. In this case, my batch was about 4 ounces shy, which is how much rice milk I used.

That mention of heavy cream was a typo, which, thanks be to the magic of bloggery, I have duly corrected.

How, you may wonder, could one mistake the words ‘heavy cream’ and ‘rice milk’? Well you may ask.

As I mentioned in the blog, we made two batches of ice cream. One no-holds-barred, dairy indulgence for us grown folk, using 2 cups of half and half, 1 cup of heavy cream, sweetened with Splenda. And the other for the grandangels, using the cans of coconut milk and about 1/2 cup of rice milk and dextrose powder. And, of course, in both we had the richness of 6 egg yolks and the flavor of the vanilla extract.

The original typed recipe was for the dairy version and when I transcribed it for the coconut version, I missed the last line…when typing it in, not when making it. I simply needed to delete that last line for the coconut version.

It would have, even as it was written, made a fine ice cream with good fats from both coconut and dairy, but it would not have been the dairy-free treat I concocted for the grandangels.


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  1. I am diabetic and I am looking for a recipe for ice cream using coconut milk without sugar. An appropriate sweetener would be stevia. Cannot tolerate splenda or xylitol.
    Can you help????
    SOS…SOS…SOS
    Rowbear

    COMMENT from MD EADES: Stevia should work just fine in place of Splenda in the recipe. You’ll just have to do a little trial and error on the amount, since with stevia, being a bitter sweetener, it’s very easy to go from Ahh! That’s just sweet enough to Yeowza! That’s bitter! Add the packets of stevia to the ice cream base a few at a time and taste in between until you get a base that is sweet enough to suit you. Then freeze it and see how it turns out. Good luck.

  2. I have used stevia in ice cream before, and you have to be VERY CAREFUL as it can freeze the mixture so fast and hard it will literally break your ice cream mixer. It’s best to add stevia close to the end, when the mixture is already almost frozen. The only problem with this is that it never fully integrates into the mix and it’s hard to get the right sweetness, but it’s better than ending up with a block of solid ice that the paddles of your ice cream mixer can’t even move!

    COMMENT from MD EADES: Thanks for the tip!

  3. Can someone post their ice cream recipies that use stevia?

    Are any of those also dairy-free – using rice milk and/or coconut milk instead of dairy ingredients.

  4. Although still a sugar, Agave Nectar is supposed to be much lower on the glycemic index. It is higher in fructose, lower in glucose = overall better for diabetics.

    http://www.blueagavenectar.com/glycemicindexofsugars.html

    I just made a really simple ice cream today with coconut milk, cocoa powder, vanilla extract and agave nectar. It turned out delish!

    COMMENT from MD EADES: Agave syrup is, as I understand it, mainly fructose and while that is easier in the short run on blood sugar levels, research has shown it to be a really bad actor in the long run for diabetics. Fructose overfeeding is what researchers use to make lab animals diabetic. It is a lipogenic sugar, meaning it is essentially metabolized quickly into fat. It elevates triglycerides, increases lipid storage in the liver, and promotes insulin resistance over the long haul.

  5. You can use stevia with flavours if you fear aftertaste of stevia. Like using vanila flavor stevia for vanila icecream. Try to find stevia that has inulin fibre (all natural) in its formulation as it helps maintain a healthy cholesterol level.

    HerbalJunky

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